Training Methodologies

Training Methodologies

We highly recommend the book “Tailored Learning: Designing the Blend That Fits” by Jennifer Hofmann and Nanette Minder. You can find it here https://www.td.org/Publications/Books/Tailored-Learning

In this book they outline the various methodologies for training. This is a nice illustration of what can encompass a blended learning approach. It is important when developing virtual learning activities that you still apply the sound principles of Instructional Design and not just rely on the technology.

Classroom We are all familiar with classroom-based learning from our years of grade school. Typically eight to 25 people attend a training session at one time. The course is led by a facilitator or team of facilitators who follow an agenda. Classroom-based courses last from two hours to 10 weeks depending on the content being taught.
E-Learning: CBT CBT refers to computer-based training. Before the emergence of the Internet, it was common to distribute training via CD-ROM or to have trainees access a computer-based course from a stand-alone machine. The Video Professor (www.videoprofessor .com) is a great example of CBT.
E-Learning: WBT Similar to CBT, WBT (web-based training) became popular once the Internet was utilized as a business tool. WBT courses are accessed via the Internet and either downloaded or executed directly from the website. WBT courses can be commercially available (such as the tutorials available from http://office.microsoft.com) or may be proprietary and hosted on an organization’s intranet—allowing access to only its employees.
E-Learning:Asynchronous Asynchronous learning is completed independently and at one’s own pace; it is not constrained by geography or time. CBT and WBT courses are both asynchronous training methodologies because the trainee can access them at a time that is convenient for him or her, can review them again and again, and can leave and return to the program as necessary. The learning is not dependent on a time, a place, other learners, or an instructor.
E-Learning:Synchronous Synchronous learning, by definition, occurs among participants, simultaneously. Classroom-based learning is synchronous learning. E-learning that occurs synchronously requires all participants and a facilitator to simultaneously access an online classroom (such as WebEx, Elluminate, or Centra).
Self-Study A self-study course is typically paper based, such as a book or training manual. Teaching yourself to use Excel by reading Excel for Dummies is an example.
Blended Learning Blended learning is a combination of training methodologies (see list above), which uses the best delivery method for the successful achievement of the learning objective. For example: Negotiation skills are better taught in a classroom or synchronous environment, which allows for real-time interaction, than in an asynchronous or self-study course. Blended learning means that one course may use three, four, or five methodologies depending on the objectives being taught.